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 Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: M. Johnson 
Date:   04-05-17 13:51

On May 5 it will be 30 years since KISS ME KISS ME KISS ME.

This is a big thing for me. In 1986, when I was 12-13, I started to abandon the Top 40. Depeche Mode, the Cure, Billy Bragg, and the The's INFECTED were my gateways.

But that Cure album was the first newly recorded disc from any artist that I was able to buy as an established fan.

How about you guys?

What were the first records you, as new aficionados, looked forward to and bought as the were released?

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Heff 
Date:   04-05-17 14:31

Ha! The ones that I can remember, I also remember how underwhelmed I was when listening to it.

Devo - Shout! *
Oingo Boingo - Boi-Ngo
Frankie Goes to Hollywood - Welcome to the Pleasuredome.

I wasn't planning to buy Kiss Me but when I saw it at Tower Records for only $10(!) back when it came out, I had to get it.

* I could argue that I got New Traditionalists and Oh No! It's Devo when they came out but I didn't know in advance. I just went to the record store (back then I went a lot) and they were there.



Post Edited (04-05-17 14:42)

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Michael Toland 
Date:   04-05-17 15:18

As a new aficionado...hmm...gonna have to think about that.

I can think of records I bought right around that same mid-80s time that cracked my music listening world in half - Peter Case's self-titled album, David + David's Boomtown, the Smithereens' Especially For You, Richard Thompson's Daring Adventures, Husker Du's Warehouse: Songs and Stories, Jason & the Scorchers' Still Standing, Last Exit's Iron Path (which I'm convinced rewrote the synapses of my brain)...even the Sex Pistols' Never Mind the Bollocks and the first four Ramones records (which I bought all at once). But those were all either records I read about in my first TP guide or had seen reviewed in Rolling Stone and was curious about.

I guess for your meaning I could count Bob Mould's Workbook. After loving Warehouse (sorry, I know that's uncool), I was eager to hear what Mould would do solo, and that album is still one of my favorites of all time. It really had, and continues to have, an impact on me.



Post Edited (04-06-17 10:43)

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: HollowbodyKay 
Date:   04-05-17 19:24

So you're looking for albums that weren't bought cold by acts that we were already into previously?

I remember pretty much losing my mind completely over both The Unforgettable Fire and The Joshua Tree when they came out. The first few dozen listens of TJT was especially revelatory to my still-tender ears.

▪ Kiss Me³ was also a heavily anticipated favorite.
▪ Darklands by the JAMC.
▪ Opel by Syd Barrett.
▪ Element of Light by Robyn Hitchcock & The Egyptians.
▪ The first few Spiritualized singles.
▪ Brotherhood by New Order.
▪ The Velvet Hour by The Clientele.
▪ Why Call It Anything? by The Chameleons.
▪ Nextdoorland by The Soft Boys.

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: breno 
Date:   04-05-17 20:19

When I first started buying music for myself and not just listening to what my brothers brought home, the first album whose release I anticipated ahead of time and made a special trip to the Peaches store over in Ferguson, MO. to obtain was Tenement Steps by the Motors.

I consider this story to be a tragedy. Tenement Steps was godawful.

Decades later, the intersection where Peaches was located was ground zero for the Ferguson riots.



Post Edited (04-05-17 20:22)

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Post-Punk Monk 
Date:   04-06-17 08:23

Breno - I'd beg to differ. Only half of "Tenement Steps" was awful. The rest was an over the top pseudo-Broadway masterpiece that Trevor Horn [and by extension Jim Steinman] would try [but fail] to top. I always wanted to digitize the tracks I loved from my LP and make a perfect CD-3 of it.

Keepers:

• Love + Loneliness [staggering arrangement and production with those stacked arpeggiated synths filling the horizon with sound]
• Metropolis
• Tenement Steps
• Nightmare Zero

Ejected:
• Modern Man [the worst song I'd ever heard at that age [17] and not surpassed 36 years later!]
• That's What John Said [seems twice as long as its 5 minute length]
• Slum People
• Here Comes The Hustler

But I am amazed that there was anyone out there anticipating this release.

Former TP subscriber [81, 82, 83, 84]

https://postpunkmonk.com
For further rumination on the Fresh New Sound of Yesterday®

Post Edited (04-06-17 08:25)

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: breno 
Date:   04-06-17 09:10

Quote:

But I am amazed that there was anyone out there anticipating this release.


My brother had given me an 8-track of Approved by the Motors for Christmas '79, as an attempt to give me my own band to collect and therefore stop stealing "his" bands, as I'd done with Blondie and a couple others. And I loved Approved by - still do, as it's a great power-pop album.

So I was really looking forward to the next one, and when I knew it had come out, I trekked over to Missouri and grabbed a copy of Tenement Steps.

Then I got it home and, far from the power-pop of Approved by, discovered it was indeed an over-the-top extravaganza of hyper-synths and multi-tracked falsetto choruses, etc., etc. Jim Steinman is definitely a good comparison. I was expecting some good ol' pub-rock/power-pop, and got Meat Loaf instead. I was displeased, though I can now listen to a few tracks from it - mostly the ones you name - with affection.

Still, I came off better that day than my brother. While at Peaches, I saw a record by a band I'd never heard of. The cover looked like it could be punk/new wave, so I took a look at it. I saw that the singer's name was Mike Reno, which was also my brother's name. I couldn't resist that, so I bought it and took it home and presented it to my brother.

And that is how my brother came to own the first Loverboy album, much to his regret.

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Post-Punk Monk 
Date:   04-06-17 09:48

Breno - Arrrgh! That whole "passing for New Wave" phenomenon where new bands like Loverboy adopted "New Wave coloration" in an attempt to ride the zeitgeist, but were actually pure meatball rock. How sad for your brother! So the Peaches empire extended all the way from Central Florida to Missouri? Who knew? I always assumed they were a local Hotlanta chain that spread throughout the Southeast, but not much further.

Former TP subscriber [81, 82, 83, 84]

https://postpunkmonk.com
For further rumination on the Fresh New Sound of Yesterday®

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: breno 
Date:   04-06-17 09:57

There were several Peaches locations in the St. Louis area.

In fact, the last vestiges of Peaches here just closed down a month ago. This last survivor had been a Peaches store back in the 70s & 80s, then I think became a Blockbuster Music store in the 90s and in the end was an FYE (there were a couple of other owners along the way, whose names I don't recall - maybe Warehouse Music was one of its guises?).

It survived for decades as a record/media store under various corporate owners in the same location, and was finally brought down by damn Chic-Fil-A being willing to pay any price for the lot it was located on.



Post Edited (04-06-17 10:11)

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Delvin 
Date:   04-06-17 10:37

There was a Peaches in Denver, back in the day.

I can think of a lot of "first albums of new material I bought as an established fan":

Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy
Destroyer
Station to Station
Eat to the Beat
Fear of Music
Duty Now for the Future
Get Happy!!
I'm the Man
Flesh + Blood
Sandinista!
Black Sea
Controversy
Pretenders II
More Specials
Reckoning
Element of Light

And, now that you mention it ...

Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me.

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: breno 
Date:   04-06-17 10:40



The St. Louis North location is the one I frequented as a high schooler and college student and whose former location was the epicenter of the riots. The South location is the one that changed many hands over the decades and finally just closed for good a month ago.

I think there were one or two more St. Louis locations, but they must have opened after 1976, when this ad ran in Rolling Stone.

And, for symmetry of thread, Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me was the first album I anticipated buying on CD as opposed to vinyl when it came out. And I bought it at Peaches!

Of course, it kind of sucked as that was the early-ish days of CD, back when they would leave songs off double albums to get them to fit on one disc. It was years before I finally heard "Hey You!!!"



Post Edited (04-06-17 11:47)

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: M. Johnson 
Date:   04-06-17 17:51

Holy smoke, Delvin! You were already a Bowie fan in '76?!

I feel like a kid and you're the cool teenager.

I'm interested to know what you thought of Sandinista when it was a new product. It's always been my favourite, but when I finally got into the Clash I had no preconceived notions, and it's always seemed weird to me to hear fans/critics at the time thought it was a failure.

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: MrFab 
Date:   04-06-17 18:11

"London Calling" made me a major Clash fan, so I got Sandinista as soon as it was released, before I'd read any reviews, and thought it was great. After I got it I didn't read any reviews - why bother, I had it?

Yeah, pretty hip, D. My 1st new Bowie album was "Scary Monsters."



Post Edited (04-06-17 18:16)

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Aitch 
Date:   04-06-17 20:24

I already had copies of B52s (s/t) and Mi Sex (Graffiti Crimes). Both were Christmas gifts from my big sister so I was just taking an interest in (I guess) New Wave when I went to see The Flowers (prior to becoming Icehouse). Support band Tactics were first on and it was at that point everything changed and I realised there was life beyond the Top 40. Do yourselves a favour and give their debut My Houdini a spin.

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: BCE 
Date:   04-06-17 21:56

Human League - Dare - came for "(Don't You) Want Me," stayed for...pretty much they have done before then and ever since

Darklands - JAMC, and also - especially - the Some Kind of Wonderful S/T, easily the best John Hughes movie S/T (wore out more copies of that than I ever did of Pretty In Pink's S/T or Breakfast Club's S/T.)

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Delvin 
Date:   04-07-17 09:58

> Holy smoke, Delvin! You were already a Bowie fan in '76?!
>
> I feel like a kid and you're the cool teenager.

Ha ha ha! Had you known me as a teenager, that notion would never, NEVER cross your mind.

Actually, it was easy to become a Bowie fan in '76, even for a 14-year-old suburban dork. The year before that, he'd been all over the radio with his first Number One single, "Fame" (which I liked a hell of a lot more than John Walker did). Before 1975 was over, "Golden Years" was a big hit too, going Top Ten in advance of Station to Station. So I was ready to hear what the Thin White Duke had to offer. Around the same time, I found my way over to Z-93, the local rock station on the FM dial, where I heard more Bowie songs that were both totally cool AND totally different from "Fame" or "Golden Years." When Changesonebowie came out -- just four months after Station to Station! -- I picked it up, and started working my way backwards from there.

Jeez, Bowie's productivity during the '70s is almost as breathtaking as his creativity. During a ten-year span, from November 1970 to September 1980, he released eleven studio albums of new material, one studio album of covers, two live albums and a greatest-hits comp.

> I'm interested to know what you thought of Sandinista when it was a new product. It's always
> been my favourite, but when I finally got into the Clash I had no preconceived notions, and
> it's always seemed weird to me to hear fans/critics at the time thought it was a failure.

I went into it with some expectations, sure, based on how much I loved London Calling from the first listen, start to finish. I ended up kinda bewildered by the range of Sandinista!, at least on first listen. But as any Bowie fan knows, an artist will go through some ch-ch-ch-ch-changes along the way. (I was a big Queen and Elton fan, too, and both of them displayed a lot of variety on their albums too.) Its range impressed me, and even its more off-the-wall songs grew on me. Still, I eventually did what a lot of fans -- heck, probably most of them -- ended up doing: I put my favorite songs from the 3-LP set on cassette for listening in my car, or on my Walkman ... and over time, basically forgot about the rest of the album's songs.

I kinda "rediscovered" Sandinista! in the digital age, once I could rip the whole thing and load it to my iPod. Its weirder songs have held up better than I realized, and as a whole, the set flows very well from start to finish.



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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Post-Punk Monk 
Date:   04-07-17 11:01

I'd heard two cuts ["D.I.Y." + "On The Air"] from peter gabriel 's 2nd album on the FM Rock I listened to from 1978-1980 and when peter gabriel III dropped I was waiting there to catch it. Oh my, but that was a mind blower.

In 1981 I'd bought John Foxx's "Metamatic" soon after I managed to find a copy of "Vienna" as the Ultrawave [sorry, Bootsy!] washed over me. I was happy to have "The Garden" get released in time for my birthday later that year.

Speaking of Ultravox, in 1979, I heard "Are 'Friends' Electric?" once on the FM Rock, and before I could even buy a copy of that, "The Pleasure Principle" dropped! So I bought that one first. It was kind of boring and monochrome, though.

I'd heard Bowie intermittently on top 40 whenever he had a hit from '72-'77 [i.e. 3 times]. I switched from top 40 to FM Rock in 1978. To my amazement, I discovered Bowie had songs other than "Space Oddity," "Fame," and "Golden Years." A friend made me a tape of "changesonebowie" in late '79 soon afterward. The first "new" Bowie album was bought the week of release: "Scary Monsters…And Supercreeps." I thought it would always be like this, but then came the horror of the 80s for Bowie. Gaaaah!!

Former TP subscriber [81, 82, 83, 84]

https://postpunkmonk.com
For further rumination on the Fresh New Sound of Yesterday®

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Delvin 
Date:   04-07-17 12:02

> I thought it would always be like this, but then came the horror of the 80s for Bowie.
> Gaaaah!!

Bowie's '80s work wasn't such a "horror" to me. Keep in mind, I fell for him on the basis of "Fame" and "Golden Years" -- both very cool songs, but also immensely popular in their day.

"Let's Dance," "China Girl" and "Modern Love" may not have been as edgy as the stuff from Scary Monsters or the Berlin trilogy, but they still were cooler than a lot of other popular stuff from that time. Same goes for "Blue Jean," "This Is Not America" (which got a lot of radio play in my neck of the woods), "Day In Day Out" and even "Bang Bang," in my opinion.

Of course, there's his duet with Jagger on "Dancing in the Streets." I guess someone told Bowie that "The Laughing Gnome" was a blot on his career, and he responded with, "Hold my drink."

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 Re: Question: Personal Milestones?
Author: Michael Toland 
Date:   04-07-17 14:04

I think the singles from Let's Dance hit a very acceptable midway point between commercial compromise and Bowie's usual inclinations. "Let's Dance" is catchy, but it's also kind of a weirdly arranged song. And I'm sure, when Bowie went to the record company and told them he heard a single in an Iggy Pop song, the A&R people responded with some variation on "Do what now?" I can't hang with his work after than (though I agree with "This is Not America" - if any jazz group can hit that same commercial/artistic midpoint, it's the Pat Metheny Group), but I don't have a problem with Let's Dance. It gave him the freedom to do whatever he wanted after that.

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